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CID Undergraduate Courses

Off-Site CID Studio Course for spring 2019

This course is for UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY and requires:
-UT EID
-upper-division standing
-a resume
-a letter of Interest

Please send all application materials to cid@austin.utexas.eduDeadline to apply is by 11:59pm on Tuesday, October 23rd. Any late applications will be waitlisted.

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Qualitative Design Studio @ McKinsey & Company, Inc.

Unique: 21069, ITD 270
Instructor: Jared Culp, Senior Experience Designer at McKinsey & Company, Inc.
Room: Off-campus at McKinsey design studios (weekly shuttle transportation is provided to and from campus 30 minutes before and after Thursday classes)
Meeting times: Thursdays 4-7pm (at McKinsey) for ten weeks on these dates: January 24th-April 4th. Tuesdays 4-7pm during this time frame are for group work on-campus.

Explores the intersection of design and research to create user centered solutions. Examines methods for creating differentiated products and services by combining design thinking and with user insights. Student will work in interdisciplinary teams to create and test a potential product. Class meets from January 24-April 4 at the McKinsey design studio in downtown Austin.

NOTE: Consent of instructor is needed and upper division standing is required.
Priority will be given to students who have previously taken ITD 301D or who are pursuing the Design Strategies BDP.

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CID Courses for spring 2019

The current courses listed are undergraduate only and are open to students of any major.

Introduction to Integrated Design

Unique: 21015, ITD 101
Instructor: Gray Garmon
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Thursdays 6-9pm for five weeks during these dates: January 24-February 21

Introduction to the concept of design thinking as a core fundamental in education and industry across all disciplines and channels. Guest speakers may facilitate discussion of various innovation issues facing businesses today.

Introduction to Design Thinking

Unique: 21020, ITD 301D
Instructor: Jeff Neely
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Tuesdays 6-9pm

What is design thinking? Most of our daily experience is the result of design, intentional or not. It’s a persistent act. We deal with the consequences all the time. In practice, design is first an act of thinking. Then, those thoughts are applied to the act of making – a product, service, place or experience, like going to Disney World. Design is at its best when designers are thinking and making with people in mind. So, a human-centered mindset is a core attribute of design thinking. Design is at its worst when it’s an afterthought, such as a confusing tax form or most ATMs. In this course, students learn the principles of design thinking and apply them to real-world problems while working in interdisciplinary teams. Students learn how to frame problems, learn about people and their behaviors, then apply those insights to improve products and services through rapid prototyping and iteration. Students from all majors are welcome.

Introduction to Design Thinking

Unique: 21025, ITD 301D
Instructor: Jared Huke
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Wednesdays 6-9pm

What is design thinking? Most of our daily experience is the result of design, intentional or not. It’s a persistent act. We deal with the consequences all the time. In practice, design is first an act of thinking. Then, those thoughts are applied to the act of making – a product, service, place or experience, like going to Disney World. Design is at its best when designers are thinking and making with people in mind. So, a human-centered mindset is a core attribute of design thinking. Design is at its worst when it’s an afterthought, such as a confusing tax form or most ATMs. In this course, students learn the principles of design thinking and apply them to real-world problems while working in interdisciplinary teams. Students learn how to frame problems, learn about people and their behaviors, then apply those insights to improve products and services through rapid prototyping and iteration. Students from all majors are welcome.

Sketching for Thinking and Communication

Unique: 21029, ITD 102
Instructor: Gray Garmon
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Wednesdays 5-6pm for a full semester

Sketching is the fastest way to convey ideas, whether in an ideation session or just taking notes in a meeting. Designed to help students learn the basic elements of sketching to visualize concepts and quickly bring alignment to any team.

Portfolio Critique

Unique: 21030, ITD 103
Instructor: Jai Dandekar
Room: DFA 4.106
Meeting times: Wednesdays 6-9pm for five weeks during these dates: January 23-February 20

Development of a portfolio of work to present for feedback. Designed to help students understand what is expected to create a personal portfolio to show potential employers

Advanced Design for Artificial Intelligence

Unique: 21044, ITD 320
Instructor: Jennifer Sukis
Room: DFA 4.106
Meeting times: Tuesdays 6-9pm

Advanced exploration of real-world scenarios posed from artificial intelligence and robotics. In-depth study of designing and solving problems for artificial intelligence.

Ethics in Artificial Intelligence Design

Unique: 21055, ITD 150
Instructor: Manoj Saxena
Room: DFA 4.112
Meeting times: Thursdays 6-9pm, for five weeks during these dates: February 28-April 4

Artificial intelligence is here to stay. The intelligent and autonomous technical systems powered by AI are specifically designed to reduce human intervention in our day-to-day lives, and these systems are already being implemented across all walks of technological life. How might we, as humans and as designers facing this new frontier, make sure that the artificial intelligences that we create protect and monitor for the abuse of human rights, for fairness, accountability, and transparency? This class will examine the role design plays in making sure AI impacts society in an ethical way. Throughout the course, we will look at how design will both define and direct the ethics of human and machine interaction.

Introduction to Augmented Reality

Unique: 21059, ITD 150
Instructor: Johannes Larcher
Room: DFA 4.126
Meeting times: Mondays 5-8pm for five weeks during these dates: January 28-February 25

Examination of the history, potential, technological breakthroughs and limitations, business and real-life applications of augmented reality. Discussion of the concepts and underpinning technologies of AR, examples of successful and unsuccessful AR ventures, and introduction to a framework for evaluation of high potential use cases.

Visual Ethnography

Unique: 21058, ITD 150
Instructor: Jon Freach
Room: ART 1.202
Meeting times: Mondays 8-11am for five weeks during these dates: January 28-February 25

Exploration of the powers of observation and developing techniques for seeing the world. Designed to help students understand the camera as a tool to capture and document findings that produce human-centered stories and design ideas through the presentation of technical fundamentals of the camera; how to plan a field research study; how to gain access, build rapport, and conduct observational research; making sense of findings and crafting a photographic essay; and storytelling.

Women in Entrepreneurship

Unique: 21057, ITD 350
Instructor: Jan Ryan
Room: DFA 4.106
Meeting times: Tuesdays and Thursdays 11am-12:30

Women in Entrepreneurship debuts in the spring of 2019. As first-of-its-kind programming, this class is designed by women, for women, and will be taught from the unique perspective of the female entrepreneurial journey. Successful female mentors and speakers will surround students with strategies for success. This is an experiential entrepreneurship course, designed for those who are interested in launching a new venture or learning how the mindset of an entrepreneur can help turn ideas into action.

Business of Design

Unique: 21060, ITD 350D
Instructor: Jeffrey Williams
Room: DFA 4.106
Meeting times: Mondays 6-9pm

Designed to help students form an advanced understanding of the role that business plays in the design industry and the operational components necessary to be successful in the design industry.

Sprinting from Problem to Prototype

Unique: 21065, ITD 170
Instructor: Shanon Marks
Room: DFA 4.106
Meeting times: Thursdays from 6-9pm for five weeks during these dates: January 24-February 21

Design Sprints are a collaborative method that brings users, business stakeholders, subject-matter experts and designers together to solve big challenges in small time frames. Developed by Google Ventures and refined through hundreds of iterations, this five step approach - Map, Sketch, Decide, Prototype, Test - enables teams to shortcut the process of developing and validating new ideas. In this course we’ll dive into the details of each step of the process, using hands-on activities and simulations to provide practical grounding and experience. Students will come away with an understanding of why to conduct a sprint, how to structure and sprint and what needs to happen to be successful.

Capstone in Integrated Design

Unique: 21070, ITD 375
Instructor: Gray Garmon and Brooks Protzmann
Room: DFA 4.114
Meeting times: Wednesdays from 11am-2pm with the instructors, Mondays from 11am-2pm with your capstone group

For students pursuing the Bridging Disciplines Program Certificate in Design Strategies. Please contact cid@austin.utexas.edu to register.